Alice Kanengoni's picture

Youth In Africa: Dominant and Counter Narratives

This Issue of BUWA! interrogates – from a feminist perspective – the current narratives on youth on the African continent. Understood in this context as a series or groups of stories that are told by individuals and groups as part of a causal set of events,1 narratives play a significant role in shaping the politics of the day in any given society. They give an insight into how people make sense of their lives and if recounted often enough and not  challenged, they become dominant perspectives that develop ideologies and influence how people interpret and understand the world around them.

Alice Kanengoni's picture

Education for Transformative Change: The Education We Need By 2030

One thing that has become clear during the process of developing the new global framework for development, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), is that the world is quickly growing in complexity.

Raisa Cole's picture

Mapping our Futures

How integrating participatory urban planning tools into the education of young women and girls can help achieve agenda 2030.

Informal Learning, Cultural Traditions and Transformation

“Educational practices intended to generate democratic possibilities must be conceived of not as neutral processes but as political acts; [that can be] hegemonic [and so] reproductive…or guided by an alternative transformative social vision” (Mayo,1999, p. 155).

Grace Chirenje's picture

Feminist Pedagogy

Unpacking the reality and building towards a new model of education for women and girls in Zimbabwe

Portia T. Loeto's picture

Making Education Safe for Women and Girls in Africa

A certain politician in Botswana had sexually abused an underage girl and was considering paying the girl’s poor mother to keep her quiet

Hilda Makamure's picture

The Gendered Interface Between Education and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Countries that invest in the education of women do better in a variety of development indicators. In fact, educating girls is one of the wisest investments any developing country can make” – Rosalyn McKeown (2004).

Lazarus Miti's picture

The Politics of Language as a Medium of Delivery in Education

Even if education is made free and compulsory, where it is delivered in an unfamiliar language, it is not possible to achieve universal primary and secondary education,

"What Was My Education For?"

That was the first time in my life I took note of the cocoa trees, and they are on the route I have walked countless times on my way to and from work. Every so often, I ask myself, “What was my education for?”


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