Interview with The Nation Senior Reporter, Suzyo Khunga

The absence of evidence of corruption in the media made it difficult for media heads and supervisors to track those that were suspected to have accepted bribes in exchange for positive coverage.

Khunga who is also MISA board member and treasurer, admitted being ferried by heads of political parties because the newspaper could not afford to take her to distant places and pay her allowances for upkeep.

June 19th, 2014

The absence of evidence of corruption in the media made it difficult for media heads and supervisors to track those that were suspected to have accepted bribes in exchange for positive coverage.

Khunga who is also MISA board member and treasurer, admitted being ferried by heads of political parties because the newspaper could not afford to take her to distant places and pay her allowances for upkeep.

Further, incidents of objectivity in reporting arose because, at times, critical stories against friends and colleagues of their superiors or favourite politicians were not published and junior reporters did not have powers to inquire why their stories were not published.

Sources also had preferred journalists who they worked with all the time for unexplained reasons. This had compromised their professional standing and made them vulnerable to manipulation.

It had become a norm for media workers to be ferried by politicians to cover events because of mainly a lack of resources. At times, resources were available but it had become a culture that journalists should ride on the backs of sources to get political stories from outside town.

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