Zimbabwe at the Crossroads

This special edition of Openspace contains a wealth of information, analysis and comment about Zimbabwe’s piecemeal and painfully slow transition process - including articles on the security sector, debt, sanctions, media reforms, constitutionalism, women, youth, censorship and much more.

If you’re interested in security sector reform then there is an authoritative paper on that ‘elephant in the room’ and a fascinating column on the need for perpetrators to face justice as well as a searing personal account of the impact of arbitrary arrests on families.

Richard Lee's picture

Author

Strategic communications for WWF

June 26th, 2011

This special edition of Openspace contains a wealth of information, analysis and comment about Zimbabwe’s piecemeal and painfully slow transition process - including articles on the security sector, debt, sanctions, media reforms, constitutionalism, women, youth, censorship and much more.

If you’re interested in security sector reform then there is an authoritative paper on that ‘elephant in the room’ and a fascinating column on the need for perpetrators to face justice as well as a searing personal account of the impact of arbitrary arrests on families.

Or perhaps you want to know the critical difference between Constitutionalism and Constitutionality – and why Zimbabwe’s adherence to the latter has led to so many draconian laws and abuses. Or why debt is the unacknowledged albatross around the country’s economic neck.

Or why – despite everything they read in the papers – some foreigner financiers think now is the time to invest in Zimbabwe. And there’s much more – from the way women have been duped and marginalised to the largely ineffective role of the church, from the root causes of SADC’s faulty mediation to the need for an entirely new invite-only African Union, from why there won’t be a North African style uprising to why Zimbabwe’s youth must seize control of their own future. If that’s not enough – you can read the two revealing interviews with the mouthpieces of ZANU-PF and MDC-T – Rugare Gumbo and Nelson Chamisa.

Or marvel at some of the stunning art that has been censored so consistently and so ludicrously – and wonder how a country can grow when it’s starved of culture. Most of all, we hope that you will not just read Openspace but that you will join the debate. We want our readers to contribute. We want our readers to dissect these articles and then take the discussion further. In that way we can help to build a more open society in Zimbabwe and across the region.

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