International criminal law – from drones to the ICC

By Tsitsi Mukamba | June 05th, 2013
Jun 13th, 2013
Drones are increasingly being deployed across Africa and yet little attention is being paid to the international and domestic laws (or indeed lack of laws) that govern their use. With drones now being used to target ‘terrorists’ in Somalia, to gather ‘intelligence’ in Niger and pinpoint rhino poachers in South Africa, it is time people looked more seriously at the complex legal issues involved. Meanwhile, following the African Union’s public spat with the International Criminal Court (ICC), this is also a critical time for international criminal law in Africa.
 
Professor Kevin Jon Heller is one of the world’s foremost experts on international criminal law in general – and the use of drones in particular. Currently, Associate Professor at Melbourne Law School, Kevin also serves as Project Director for International Criminal Law at the Asia Pacific Centre for Military Law. His first major book The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law was published in 2011. In addition, Kevin has been involved in the International Criminal Court’s negotiations over the crime of aggression, and served from December 2008 until February 2011 as one of Radovan Karadzic's formally-appointed legal associates. 
 
What:                   Talk by Professor Kevin Jon Heller followed by Q&A
When:                  Thursday June 13th 
Time:                    11:00–12:30 (A light lunch will be served post the Brown Bag)
Where:                 OSISA Boardroom, Ground Floor, President’s Place, 1 Hood Avenue, Rosebank 
RSVP:                  Tsitsi Mukamba  before Thursday, 16 May 2013
 
Professor Kevin Jon Heller iss Associate Professor & Reader at Melbourne Law School, where he teaches international criminal law and criminal law. He also serves as Project Director for International Criminal Law at the Asia Pacific Centre for Military Law, a joint project of Melbourne Law School and the Australian Defence Force. He holds a PhD in law from Leiden University, a JD with distinction from Stanford Law School, an MA with honours in literature from Duke University, and an MA and BA, both with honours, in sociology from the New School for Social Research.
 
Kevin’s academic writing has appeared in a variety of journals, including the European Journal of International Law, the American Journal of International Law, the Journal of International Criminal Justice, the Harvard International Law Journal, the Michigan Law Review, the Leiden Journal of International Law, the Journal of Criminal Law & Criminology, Criminal Law Forum, and the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review. His book The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law was published by Oxford University Press in June 2011; Stanford University Press published his edited book (with Markus Dubber) The Handbook of Comparative Criminal Law in February 2011; and he is currently writing a book entitled A Geneology of International Criminal Law, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2015. He is a permanent member of the international-law blog Opinio Juris.
 
On the practical side, Kevin has been involved in the International Criminal Court’s negotiations over the crime of aggression, served as Human Rights Watch’s external legal advisor on the trial of Saddam Hussein, and served from December 2008 until February 2011 as one of Radovan Karadzic's formally-appointed legal associates. He also regularly conducts training in IHL on behalf of Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection, a Brussels-based NGO, in association with the Harvard Program on Conflict Research.
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