GDP

GDP tool and model is macho and masks inequalities – especially gendered inequalities. 

Economic justice is required to level the playing field and facilitate gender equality. This can only be altered through structural interventions that will empower women and a concerted focus on changing their socioeconomic status.

For decades, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has been used the world over as the measure for economic progress and development. Policies and programmes designed to end poverty and inequality have thus been designed and informed through this GDP lens. Yet, the GDP tool and model is macho and masks inequalities – especially gendered inequalities. A telling case is the current ‘Africa Rising’ narrative which is largely based on a narrow focus of African countries’ upward showing in GDP performance.

During the 1980s and 90s – the lost decades of development for Sub-Sahara – African states implemented Structural Adjustment Programmes at the behest of the IMF and World Bank. The new millennium, however, witnessed a change of fortunes, marked by rising growth at an annual average of at least 5% during the period 2000-2015.

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