Rethinking approaches, reconsidering strategies

BUWA! is intended to respond to the need for a regular and open space within which African women may tell their stories and document their lives. The African Union has declared 2010–2020 the African Women’s Decade, and BUWA! will provide Africa’s women with a means of recording their experiences, reviewing their strategies, highlighting best practices, challenging norms and amplifying women’s voices throughout the decade and beyond.Produced biannually, BUWA!

Alice Kanengoni's picture

Gender and Women's Rights Programme Manager

June 25th, 2011

BUWA! is intended to respond to the need for a regular and open space within which African women may tell their stories and document their lives. The African Union has declared 2010–2020 the African Women’s Decade, and BUWA! will provide Africa’s women with a means of recording their experiences, reviewing their strategies, highlighting best practices, challenging norms and amplifying women’s voices throughout the decade and beyond.Produced biannually, BUWA! will provide a platform for women on the continent to review and critique their feminisms; share their struggles; exchange and assess their strategies, methodologies and tools; and craft feminisms that respond to the ever-changing incarnations and manifestations of the systems that unequally position them. With the new and emerging challenges that women and men have to deal with on the continent, the need to continually rethink our approaches cannot be overemphasised.This first issue of BUWA! brings to the fore what many feminists are increasingly identifying as key issues needing urgent reconsideration and thorough reflection, in the quest for social justice. Articles collected in this issue span a wide spectrum of topics, including: an articulation of the need to rethink our conceptual frameworks; the necessity of reflecting on global processes and economic ideologies (and how these are impacting on, and influencing, how women and men are experiencing their lives on the continent today); an assessment of how the laws and policies that many feminists and women’s rights activists fought and advocated for in the past few decades are (or are not) providing vehicles though which women can access justice; and personal stories and firsthand accounts of how individual women in the region have interacted with and experienced the realities embodied in these abstract notions.

About the author(s)

Alice Kanengoni manages the Gender and Women’s Rights programme at OSISA. She joined OSISA from the Johannesburg-based Gender Links, a regional organisation focusing on gender and women’s rights, where she worked as a Senior Researcher. Prior to that, she had worked as a Senior Researcher and deputy head of the gender programme at the Southern African Research and Documentation Centre (SARDC) in Harare. Alice holds a Masters Degree in Media and Communications, and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Literature.

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